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Government Resources

Getting Started with Government Assistance

Cerebral palsy can be expensive to families, especially those lacking adequate insurance benefits or those in a low-income situation. Many programs have been developed within the government, at various levels (federal, state, and local), to assist with such needs.

The challenge seems to be in understanding what types of programs are available, where to find more information on the programs, how to apply, when to apply, and what to expect during the process.

Consideration of the following programs can serve as first steps towards getting started with government assistance. MyChild has a vast database of resources that may provide additional resources, when you are ready.

MyChild call center representatives are available to provide assistance in finding particular resources, not easily found on the web, or within your community. The more our call center representatives know about your child’s condition and your family’s needs, the more we will are able to provide resources tailored specifically for your family. Call MyChild at today!


woman sitting at computer paying bills

Cash Assistance

Cash assistance allows families to meet basic needs, such as food, water, and shelter. Some forms of cash assistance fund temporary and emergent needs, while others are established for long-term support services to those with chronic health concerns.
Cash Assistance »

child care worker surrounded by children working on a project

Child Care Assistance

Finding a child care program or facility that meets the needs of a child with cerebral palsy is an expensive undertaking. Luckily, families that meet a certain set of criteria can take advantage of government funding and supports.
Child Care Assistance »

teacher working with students in the classroom

Education Assistance

In order to be included in the educational process, parents of a child with cerebral palsy work closely with special education administrators to optimize their child’s potential for lifelong learning. Appreciating the value of education and the purpose of special education provides the basis for collaboration.
Education Assistance »

adults filling out employment applications

Employment Assistance

It’s a sad fact that people with disabilities have a significantly higher level of unemployment than the rest of the population, even though many are well-suited for most workplaces. There are many factors that may hold people back from employment, but having a disability shouldn’t be one of them.
Employment Assistance »


family at kitchen sink making dinner

Energy Assistance

Keeping the lights on and the house heated are not necessarily the first thoughts a parent has when they learn their child has disabilities, but eventually, the cost of energy can become a point of concern as expenses for doctor appointments, medications, therapies and other household expenditures increase.
Energy Assistance »

two doctors examining smiling child

Health Care Assistance

Medicare is the national health and social insurance program in the United States. The 47-year-old program guarantees access to health care as long as the applicant meets the requirements of the program. Currently, the official enrollment age is 65, unless an applicant meets specific requirements set for in regards to a disability.
Health Care Assistance »

person flanked by bills holding up a white flag

Health Insurance

Finding affordable health insurance for children and adults with long-term medical conditions, such as cerebral palsy, can be a major concern for most parents. A health insurance policy is a contract between an insurance company and a policy holder intended to safeguard against high and unexpected health care costs.
Health Insurance »

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Housing and Rental Assistance

Parents have many concerns about how to make ends meet. One of the most important concerns a parent has about money is how to retain a safe and affordable dwelling in which to live. Persons with disabilities are afforded rights to ensure that housing is accessible, and to protect applicants from housing discrimination.
Housing and Rental Assistance »


family of four sitting on couch

Nutrition Assistance

The government recognizes that families touched by cerebral palsy may find themselves in need of government assistance to afford proper nutrition for their child with special needs, and the family as a whole. These programs were developed to help families in need.
Nutrition Assistance »

a woman uses her lift to gain entry to her vehicle as a person tries to help

Safety and Protection

Feeling safe is an important aspect of life. It gives people a chance to enjoy their lives without the fear that they could be harmed physically, psychologically, or financially. Being safe at home or in public takes some preventative measures, precautionary planning and building confidence.
Safety and Protection »


About government assistance

Government assistance in the United States originated in the 1930s as a result of the Great Depression. At that time, vulnerable groups – seniors and those with disabilities – needed help just to get by. In the early days of government aid, assistance was structured based on age, income, or disability qualification. Over the years, however, the criteria for assistance has become more need-based.

Since the 1930s, disbursement of government funds for citizens in need has shifted from the federal level to various government agencies at the state level. The Federal Government provides structure and allocates funds, while state governments are largely responsible for qualifying a person in and dispersing available funds.

The state governments are held accountable for distributing funds among citizens based on guiding principles set by the Federal Government. States do have some leeway and therefore do differ on the criteria they use when dispersing funds for national programs. Some states also develop additional programs of assistance they deem necessary for their citizens.

Citizens in need are encouraged to apply for programs through their state and local government agencies. Not all who apply are accepted to any given program; each has specific guidelines and sometimes those guidelines include allocating funds to those who are determined most in need.

Those applying for an assistance program should meet application deadlines and requirements, but not become discouraged if denied. Most agencies allow individuals to reapply; those rejected are advised to review eligibility requirements and apply again within the deadline period. In some instances, a personal consultation with a government representative may be in order, or an inquiry can be initiated.

Every department within the state and federal government system offers services and programs. For instance, special education is a division of the Department of Education and structured to provide educational services and programs geared toward equal access to education for children with disability or impairment. The Department of Housing and Urban Development has entities that oversee affordable housing options for those with disability or low income. The Department of Energy provides energy assistance programs for those on fixed incomes.

MyChild does not claim expert knowledge on every opportunity, as programs and service requirements are numerous and ever-changing. However, over time MyChild has developed a database with government assistance programs many of our families have found helpful.

MyChild has provided a basic description of the programs and relevant links to national websites to learn more about these programs from the sources that administer them. The following programs are a good starting point for those looking for assistance. There are many more!

Call MyChild today at 1- for additional resources.

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